Posts Tagged ‘content’

The Cloud’s Potentially Huge Liability

This post was originally posted on the Adaptive Path blog.

For all intents and purposes, the cloud has been an overwhelming hit. For most people with readily available high speed internet, it has taken a lot of the pain and cost away from the storage and management of digital content. Adoption of cloud services have hit the point where many people now integrate them into their daily habits. Under normal circumstances, I would consider this to be a good thing, but as things stand, I feel as though this trend is going to blow up in our face. The impending problems have nothing to do with cloud services or the cloud in general. The problem is with the policies placed around how we access it, specifically data caps from our broadband and wireless data providers.

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Next Steps for This Blog. Please Chime In.

A couple weeks ago, I abruptly altered the format in which I began to blog. For better or for worse, I have a history of doing things like this. A few years back, I transitioned from exclusively large-form writing to ultra-light content—often times limited to a single sentence. I was able to generate tons of content on a daily basis, but after years of pushing out content of this genre, I felt that the content being created was severely lacking in depth. So I have tried to find a good middle ground between extremely in-depth content that could take weeks or months to get out due to my schedule and quick, consistent yet shallow updates. In addition, I am really trying to get my own personal process in order rather than relying on gizmos and gadgets as I did in the past. I wanted to post this to both give you an insight as to what is around the corner as well as open the floor to see get your thoughts on this new content format. Read On…

Creating a More Conversational Online Landscape

As you may have read, I am very interested in improving the way we create, distribute and interact with content online &mdash especially pertaining to the content of ideas and concepts. So much of the effort during the blogging and Web2.0 explosion was focused on empowering the individual to create and share content. Just think of YouTube’s tagline, Broadcast Yourself. What excites me is that there are a plethora of startups focusing on the facilitation of creating rather than broadcasting of the created.

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Lessons Learned From an Almost-Wonderful Publishing Process

Roughly two years ago, I began the processs of blogging on this site in a very different manner than I had in the previous seven years. I turned my blog into an aggregator of various content that I posted elsewhere on the internet. This process has impacted not only how I published content, but how I interacted with other content online. There are plenty of lifestream/aggregation blogs on the web, but from what I have come across, I had carved out my own little unique process to quickly and easily generate content on my blog. It was that convenience that allowed me to overlook the litany of compromises to quality in the end product. My belief was that if I made it easy on myself, I ensured that I would post content more frequently which would provide value to readers. However, the process could often times not be so quick or easy and over the months it became clear that it was simply no longer worth the sacrifice in quality. The idea behind how I worked all these years still has merit and therefore I thought it would be worthwhile to share how I blogged these past two years, why it ultimately did not pan out and how I intend to move forward. Read On…

What Comes After Sharing?

This post was originally posted on the Adaptive Path blog.

Sharing ideas, work and knowledge used to be an extremely novel concept. It is now increasingly accepted as vital for community recognition and distinction for businesses. We publish all types of information online, but the sharing of ideas, thoughts and insights is arguably the most fundamental and imperative form. With the pervasiveness of sharing, its current manifestation is quickly becoming the lowest common denominator. Our standard methods of sharing are quite old (in internet years) and improvements upon them are yielding diminishing returns. The thought leaders and evangelists of ideas who fostered the sharing environment will likely push sharing to its next step. I believe the focus of this next step needs to be on behavioral and technological improvements allowing shared ideas to more easily grow beyond their initial form and also empowers communities to participate in the process.

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